Former NASA Engineer Soaked Himself in Blood to Lure Sharks—The Result Was Bone-Chilling

In a heart-stopping experiment, a former NASA engineer, who has become a popular YouTuber, covered himself in blood to test if sharks would attack him. The outcome was as terrifying as it sounds.

Mark Rober, who once engineered projects for NASA, turned to YouTube to share his adventurous science experiments. Back in 2019, he traveled to the Bahamas with marine biologist and shark diving expert, Luke Tipple, to test a popular movie myth: do sharks wildly attack at the slightest scent of human blood?

Rober designed the cage. (YouTube/Mark Rober)

Initial Findings

Rober began by testing how sharks would react to human blood. He meticulously dropped his own blood into the ocean, monitoring the response. Surprisingly, not a single shark showed interest in the blood, which was dispersed at a rate of 15 drops per minute. This initial test debunked the myth of sharks as relentless predators that could detect blood from miles away.

Advancing the Experiment

Undeterred, Rober returned to the Bahamas in 2020 to advance his research. This time, he and Tipple created a massive batch of fish blood using a blender, resulting in five gallons of what Rober described as a “mouth-watering fish blood smoothie.” The goal was to compare the sharks’ reactions to fish blood against their earlier indifference to human blood.

He seemed pretty scared in the video. (YouTube/Mark Rober)

To mimic human blood without the risk, they used cow’s blood. The sharks showed a dramatically higher interest in fish blood, with 134 approaches compared to only eight for the mammal blood.

The Climactic Test

The climax of Rober’s experiment came when he entered an underwater cage surrounded by bags of the fish blood smoothie. The scene quickly turned dramatic as sharks swarmed around him, attracted by the blood. Rober’s reactions ranged from screams to nervous laughter as he observed the sharks’ teeth up close, commenting on their apparent desire to “eat me real bad.”

The experiment reached its peak intensity when Rober had to escape the cage while a diver distracted the sharks with a bait box. Despite the close calls and high tension, Rober emerged without any injuries, albeit visibly shaken.

Reflections on the Experience

Reflecting on his experience, Rober shared a profound thought: “As humans, we’re always the predator and not really ever the prey.” He likened his feelings during the experiment to what a tuna must feel like, providing a deep insight into the predator-prey dynamics in the ocean.

This experiment not only provided thrilling content for his YouTube channel but also offered valuable insights into shark behavior, challenging widespread misconceptions and fears. Rober’s daring and innovative approach continues to captivate and educate his audience on the complexities of marine life.

  • Animals

    Former NASA Engineer Soaked Himself in Blood to Lure Sharks—The Result Was Bone-Chilling

    In a heart-stopping experiment, a former NASA engineer, who has become a popular YouTuber, covered himself in blood to test if sharks would attack him. The outcome was as terrifying as it sounds.

    Mark Rober, who once engineered projects for NASA, turned to YouTube to share his adventurous science experiments. Back in 2019, he traveled to the Bahamas with marine biologist and shark diving expert, Luke Tipple, to test a popular movie myth: do sharks wildly attack at the slightest scent of human blood?

    Rober designed the cage. (YouTube/Mark Rober)

    Initial Findings

    Rober began by testing how sharks would react to human blood. He meticulously dropped his own blood into the ocean, monitoring the response. Surprisingly, not a single shark showed interest in the blood, which was dispersed at a rate of 15 drops per minute. This initial test debunked the myth of sharks as relentless predators that could detect blood from miles away.

    Advancing the Experiment

    Undeterred, Rober returned to the Bahamas in 2020 to advance his research. This time, he and Tipple created a massive batch of fish blood using a blender, resulting in five gallons of what Rober described as a “mouth-watering fish blood smoothie.” The goal was to compare the sharks’ reactions to fish blood against their earlier indifference to human blood.

    He seemed pretty scared in the video. (YouTube/Mark Rober)

    To mimic human blood without the risk, they used cow’s blood. The sharks showed a dramatically higher interest in fish blood, with 134 approaches compared to only eight for the mammal blood.

    The Climactic Test

    The climax of Rober’s experiment came when he entered an underwater cage surrounded by bags of the fish blood smoothie. The scene quickly turned dramatic as sharks swarmed around him, attracted by the blood. Rober’s reactions ranged from screams to nervous laughter as he observed the sharks’ teeth up close, commenting on their apparent desire to “eat me real bad.”

    The experiment reached its peak intensity when Rober had to escape the cage while a diver distracted the sharks with a bait box. Despite the close calls and high tension, Rober emerged without any injuries, albeit visibly shaken.

    Reflections on the Experience

    Reflecting on his experience, Rober shared a profound thought: “As humans, we’re always the predator and not really ever the prey.” He likened his feelings during the experiment to what a tuna must feel like, providing a deep insight into the predator-prey dynamics in the ocean.

    This experiment not only provided thrilling content for his YouTube channel but also offered valuable insights into shark behavior, challenging widespread misconceptions and fears. Rober’s daring and innovative approach continues to captivate and educate his audience on the complexities of marine life.